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10.3 The Right Leadership: The Key to Board Effectiveness

Independent board leadership capable of shepherding the board’s priorities and providing a voice for the concerns of other outside directors is critical to board effectiveness. While not the only way to establish such leadership, a nonexecutive chair can strengthen the independence of the board and help create a healthy check-and-balance between management and the board. As an alternative, some boards have adopted the so-called lead director model. If they do choose to appoint a nonexecutive chair, boards should ensure that the individual selected for this position has the experience, temperament, and commitment to the role to be effective. An effective chair serves as the leader of the board, keeps directors focused on the board’s major priorities, sets meeting agendas, leads discussions, and occasionally serves as a board spokesperson. According to consulting firm Spencer Stuart, the chair’s specific responsibilities cover four main areas:

  1. Managing the board. This involves chairing board meetings, as well as leading executive sessions of the independent directors.
  2. Communication. This includes maintaining regular communications with senior management and other directors to set meeting agendas and to discuss information flow and emerging issues.
  3. Succession planning. Nonexecutive chairs are well positioned to play a leading role in CEO succession planning.
  4. Board evaluations. Best practice suggests that the governance committee should manage the board and director evaluation process, with the committee chair gathering director feedback. Nevertheless, the chair has a significant role to play in conflict resolution.Spencer Stuart (2008).

In addition to being a focal point for the board, the chair can also be an important mentor for the CEO. Many people, therefore, believe he or she should be a consensus choice of both the board members and the CEO. Also, as part of his or her duties, a chair should make him- or herself visible inside the company—by participating in major company meetings, by being easily accessible to employees (in person, via e-mail, or by phone). The rationale for creating visibility is that, if bad things happen in the company, employees should know they have a person on the board—namely the chair—they can go to.

Performing all these duties well is a tall order and requires a unique combination of experience, dedication, and the right temperament. To lead effectively, a nonexecutive chair must understand the function of each board committee and the role of an individual director, and must be conscious of not undermining the CEO’s authority, especially in front of the senior management team. Learning on the job is not an option.

Beyond executive and board experience, good “people” and “communication” skills are essential. A nonexecutive chair must know how to create focus and how to build consensus on the board. He or she also needs to facilitate effective communication between the board and management and avoid becoming a barrier between the two. This requires diplomacy, an ability to be direct and concise without offending anyone, a passion for the job, and a minimal ego. An effective nonexecutive chair exercises leadership and avoids creating the impression that he or she is trying to run the show.

Who can fill these rather large shoes? According to Spencer Stuart, 73% of the nonexecutive chairs on Standard & Poor’s 500 boards are retired corporate executives. About half formerly served as the CEO of another company—experience that is extremely valuable to be effective in the role.Spencer Stuart (2008).