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Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the following colleagues who have reviewed the text and provided comprehensive feedback and suggestions for improving the material:

  • Donald Army, Dominican University of California
  • David Bloomquist. Georgia State University
  • Teuta Cata, Northern Kentucky University
  • Chuck Downing, Northern Illinois University
  • John Durand, Pepperdine University
  • Marvin Golland, Polytechnic Institute of New York University
  • Brandi Guidry, University of Louisiana
  • Kiku Jones, The University of Tulsa
  • Fred Kellinger, Pennsylvania State University–Beaver Campus
  • Ram Kumar, University of North Carolina–Charlotte
  • Eric Kyper, Lynchburg College
  • Alireza Lari, Fayetteville State University
  • Mark Lewis, Missouri Western State University
  • Eric Malm, Cabrini College
  • Roberto Mejias, University of Arizona
  • Esmail Mohebbi, University of West Florida
  • John Preston, Eastern Michigan University
  • Shu Schiller, Wright State University
  • Tod Sedbrook, University of Northern Colorado
  • Richard Segall, Arkansas State University
  • Ahmad Syamil, Arkansas State University
  • Sascha Vitzthum, Illinois Wesleyan University

In addition, a select group of instructors assisted the development of this material by actually using it in their classrooms. Their input, along with their students’ feedback, has provided critical confirmation that the material is effective and impactful in the classroom:

  • Animesh Animesh, McGill University
  • Michel Benaroch, Syracuse University
  • Barney Corwin, University of Maryland–College Park
  • Lauren B. Eder, Rider University
  • Rob Fichman, Boston College
  • James Gips, Boston College
  • Jerry Kane, Boston College
  • Fred Kellinger, Penn State University–Beaver Campus
  • Eric Kyper, Lynchburg College
  • Ann Majchrzak, University of Southern California
  • Eric Malm, Cabrini College
  • Michael Martel, Ohio University
  • Ido Millet, Pennsylvania State University–Erie Campus
  • Ellen Monk, University of Delaware
  • Sam Ransbotham, Boston College
  • Nachiketa Sahoo, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shu Schiller, Wright State University
  • Tom Schambach, Illinois State University
  • Jack Spang, Boston College
  • Sascha Vitzthum, Illinois Wesleyan University

A tremendous thanks to my student research team at Boston College. In particular, the work of Xin (Steven) Liu, Justin Tease, and Liz Dean sped things along and helped this project be rich with interesting examples.

A particularly strong thanks goes out to my colleagues at Boston College, especially to Jim Gips and Andy Boynton for their unwavering support of the project; to Rob Fichman and Jerry Kane for helping shape the social media section; to Sam Ransbotham for guiding me through the minefield of information security; and to Mary Cronin, Peter Olivieri, and Jack Spang for suggestions and encouragement. And my enduring thanks go to my students who continue to inspire, impress, and teach me more than I thought possible.