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Chapter 16 Appendix E: Resources

16.1 Simulations on Building Organizational Capacity and Leading Change

Judge, W., & Hill, L. (2010). Change management: Power and influence. Retrieved from http://hbr.org/product/change-management-harvard-managementor- online-modu/an/6789E-HTM-ENG?Ntt= change%2520management%2520power%2520and%2520influence

In this single-player simulation produced by Harvard Business Publishing in Boston, students play one of two roles at a sunglass manufacturing firm and face the challenges associated with implementing an organization-wide environmental sustainability initiative. The initiative seeks to change raw material inputs in order to make the company’s products more “green” and also to address environmental waste issues. The simulation includes up to four scenarios with different combinations of two important factors for creating change: the relative power of the change agent and the relative urgency associated with the change initiative. In each scenario, students choose among different change levers in an attempt to persuade key members of the organization to adopt the change initiative. Students are assessed on their ability to achieve the greatest percentage of adopters within the company while simultaneously using the fewest resources. Appropriate for use in undergraduate, graduate, and executive business programs.

ExperiencePoint. (2010). Experience change simulations. Retrieved from http://www.experiencepoint.com/

In this single-player simulation produced by ExperiencePoint in Toronto, students play the role of a change agent in four different organizational contexts. For the GlobalTech simulation, players lead change in a siloed organization that needs to be more customer focused. For the SkyTech simulation, players lead a corporate social responsibility initiative in a global corporation. For the Lakeview simulation, players implement lean practices to reduce patient wait times in a hospital emergency department. For the Central-Valley view simulation, players balance the needs of internal and external stakeholders as they lead the merger of two hospitals.

16.2 Other Books and Articles on Aspects of Organizational Capacity for Change

Beer, M., & Eisenstadt, R. (1994). Developing an organization capable of implementing strategy and learning. Human Relations, 49, 597–620.

Bennett, J. L. (2000). Leading the edge of change: Building individual and organizational capacity for the evolving nature of change. Mooresville, NC: Paw Print Press.

Bethune, G. (1998). From worst to first: Behind the scenes of Continental’s remarkable comeback. New York, NY: Wiley.

Bishop, C. (2000). Making change happen one person at a time: Assessing change capacity within your organization. New York, NY: AMACON.

Collins, J., & Porras, J. (1994). Built to last: Successful habits of visionary companies. New York, NY: HarperBusiness.

Dell, M. (2000). Direct from Dell: Strategies that revolutionized an industry. New York, NY: HarperBusiness.

Fullan, M. (2008). The six secrets of change: What the best leaders do to help their organizations survive and thrive. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Gardner, H. (2004). Changing minds: The art and science of changing our own and other people’s minds. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Gerstner, L. (2002). Who says elephants can’t dance? New York, NY: HarperBusiness.

Hock, D. (2005). One from many: VISA and the rise of chaordic organization. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler.

Judge, W., & Blocker, C. (2008). Organizational capacity for change and strategic ambidexterity: Flying the plane while rewiring it. European Journal of Marketing, 42(9/10), 915–926.

Judge, W., & Douglas, T. (2009). The evolution of the organizational capacity for change construct. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 22(6), 635–649.

Judge, W., & Elenkov, D. (2005). Organizational capacity for change and environmental performance: An empirical assessment of Bulgarian firms. Journal of Business Research, 58, 894–901.

Judge, W., Naoumova, I., Douglas, T., & Kouzevol, N. (2009). Organizational capacity for change and firm performance in Russia. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 20(8), 1737–1752.

Lawler, E., & Worley, C. (2006). Built to change: How to achieve sustained organizational effectiveness. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Lengnick-Hall, C., & Beck, T. (2005). Adaptive fit versus robust transformation: How organizations respond to environmental change. Journal of Management, 31(5), 738–757.

Price Waterhouse. (1996). The paradox principles: How high performance companies manage chaos, complexity, and contradiction to achieve superior results. Chicago, IL: Irwin.

Seidman, D. (2007). How: Why how we do anything means everything in business (and in life). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley

Staber, U., & Sydow, J. (2002). Organizational adaptive capacity: A structuration perspective. Journal of Management Inquiry, 11, 408–424.

Thames, R., & Webster, D. (2009). Chasing change: Building organizational capacity in a turbulent environment. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

16.3 Fourteen Teaching Cases That Illustrate the Organizational Capacity for Change Framework

AT&T: The Dallas Works

Case ID: HBS 492023

Trustworthy leadership: Ken Weatherford

Trusting followers: Union turmoil

Capable champions: Sandy Ward

Involved midmanagement: Ad hoc teams

Systems thinking: Guiding coalition

Communication systems: Multichannel

Accountable culture: Avoid plant closing

Innovative culture: Products and processes

Cisco Systems

Case ID: HBS 409061

Trustworthy leadership: John Chambers

Capable champions: Customer champions

Systems thinking: IT systems

Accountable culture: Customer focus

Citigroup (A)

Case ID: HBS 308001

Trustworthy leadership: Chuck Prince

Systems thinking: Merger challenge

Communication systems: Problem area

Accountable culture: Problem area

Innovative culture: Problem area

Digital Chocolate

Case ID: HBS 401049

Trustworthy leadership: Trip Hawkins

Capable champions: Problem area

Involved midmanagement: Problem area

Systems thinking: E-mail, meetings

Communication systems: Venture burn rate

Accountable culture: Growth potential

EBay

Case ID: HBS 401024

Trustworthy leadership: Meg Whitman

Involved midmanagement: Fully engaged

Systems thinking: Acquire Krause?

Accountable culture: Problem Area

Innovative culture: Customer focus

Hindustan Lever

Case ID: HBS 410002

Trustworthy leadership: Biswaranjan Sen

Trusting followers: Union turmoil

Capable champions: Suchita Prasan

Systems thinking: Problem area

Communication systems: Problem area

Accountable culture: Extreme downsizing

Innovative culture: British hierarchy

Merck (A)

Case ID: HBS 499054

Trustworthy leadership: Ray Gilmartin

Capable champions: Mgt. committee

Involved midmanagement: Functional silos

Systems thinking: Merger challenge

Communication systems: Problem area

Accountable culture: Problem area

Innovative culture: Drug creation

Northwest Airlines

Case ID: HBS 491036

Trustworthy leadership: Steve Rothmeir

Trusting followers: Union turmoil

Capable champions: Dr. Ken Myers

Involved midmanagement: Merger integration

Systems thinking: Merger challenge

Communication systems: Problem area

Accountable culture: Problem area

Innovative culture: Problem area

Oticon

Case ID: IMD 079

Trustworthy leadership: Lars Kolind

Trusting followers: Relocation Resistance

Capable champions: Sten Davidsen

Involved midmanagement: Problem area

Accountable culture: Problem area

Innovative culture: Problem area

P&G in the 21st Century

Case ID: MBS 309030

Trustworthy leadership: A. G. Lafley

Trusting followers: Problem area

Involved midmanagement: Walk the talk

Communication systems: Problem area

Accountable culture: Global integration

Innovative culture: Problem area

Renault-Nissan

Case ID: TB 0047

Trustworthy leadership: Louis Schweitzer

Trusting followers: Downsizing

Capable champions: Carlos Ghosn

Involved midmanagement: Cultural differences

Systems thinking: Merger challenge

Communication systems: Problem area

Accountable culture: Problem area

Innovative culture: Mavericks elevated

Siemens Nixdorf

Case ID: HBS 396203

Trustworthy leadership: Gerhard Schulmeyer

Capable champions: Mark Maletz

Involved midmanagement: Problem area

Innovative culture: Global expansion

Walt Disney’s Dennis Hightower

Case ID: HBS 395055

Trustworthy leadership: Dennis Hightower

Trusting followers: Country Managers

Capable champions: Problem area

Involved midmanagement: Problem area

Systems thinking: European integration

Communication systems: Group vs. individual

Accountable culture: Problem area

Innovative culture: Growth potential

Wyeth Pharmaceutical

Case ID: SGBS L-15

Trustworthy leadership: Micahel Kamarck

Capable champions: Guiding coalition

Systems thinking: Learning teams

Communication systems: Multichannel

Accountable culture: Cut costs 25% in 1 year