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13.8 End-of-Chapter Exercises

It’s Your Turn

  1. Visit http://www.choosemyplate.gov/ to research suggestions to help kids eat healthier foods. Create a list of tips for parents.
  2. Visit http://www.webmd.com/diet/food-fitness-planner/default.htm to create a food and fitness plan that fits your current height, weight, and lifestyle.
  3. Create a list of nutritional tips for adults who are caring for their elderly parents after watching the following video:

    Nutrition for Senior Citizens

Apply It

  1. Visit http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/default.aspx to study the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Then create a chart that suggests physical activities for teens, young adults, and middle-aged adults, and includes the amount of physical activity recommended for each group per week.
  2. How do the physical changes that a preteen experiences during puberty relate to changing nutrient needs? Hold a small group discussion to talk about puberty and nutrition.
  3. Research ways to help an older adult who suffers from poor intake to get enough nutrients at the following website: http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/preventive-medicine/aging-preventive-health/. Then create a brochure for patients to explain your findings.

Expand Your Knowledge

  1. Write a short speech that you would give to a group of school children between ages nine and thirteen. Explain to them how their sugar intake impacts their bodies and overall well-being.
  2. Consider the changing needs of an older adolescent, along with a teen’s access to food and desire to make dietary choices. Then create a three-day meal plan for a teenage boy or girl.
  3. After watching the video, hold a small group discussion to discuss the influence of environment, economics, culture, and lifestyle on dietary choices.

    The Obesity Epidemic